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Secrets Of Great Resume : Resume Writing Tips By Resume Builders













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Know What A Great Resume Is Supposed To Do
The goal of a great resume is to secure interviews. It does this by qualifying a candidate for a specific position and enticing the reader to want meet the candidate in person, to learn more.
 
Know Your Reader
Successful writers quickly learn to write for the reader. This is true whether writing an article, a novel, a term paper or a resume. While it may be tempting to write a career autobiography, rather than a resume, chances are that few will be interested in reading it.
What does it mean to “write for the reader?” It means knowing what your reader needs and wants to know, and providing that information, and only that information, as early in the document as possible.
 
When it comes to the resume, the reader is typically a recruiter, a hiring manager or a potential employer.
 
What do we know about this reader? Well, we know that his or her time is limited. The resume reader (hiring manager) typically has hundreds of resumes to sort through, with a limited amount of time in which to do this, an important decision to make (“Which of these candidates is qualified enough to interview?”), and other work to complete.
 
Resumes typically receive an initial “reading” time of 15 seconds, or less. Therefore, it's important that your document sell your qualifications from the moment your reader picks up your document. It should make your reader feel, “This person understands what I’m trying to achieve. He or she has written this document for me.”
 
In order to write for the reader, you need to understand what your reader is trying to achieve and be able to make an educated guess regarding what it is he or she wants to know. If you have a good understanding of the positions you’re targeting, and what these positions will entail, then you already have a better sense of what your reader is hoping to secure than you may, at first, imagine.
 
For example, you know that your reader is trying to locate qualified candidates, and you know that what makes a candidate “qualified” is a certain set of skills, abilities and personality characteristics (often outlined in an ad). Therefore, any unrelated information (such as unrelated skills, positions, interests or hobbies), will have little value to this reader.
 
You know that your reader will only give about 15 seconds of attention to your document, so it would be wise to lead with the most important information in priority. This isn’t a reader who enjoys a good mystery.
 
And you know that your reader wants to find a candidate as soon as possible – so that he or she can get back to the business of doing business. So a great resume is ready when an opportunity presents itself, because the opportunity may be fleeting.
 
 












































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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