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Writing Your Resume : Basics Of Resume Writing













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Contact Information
What is the most important information on your resume? Is it the great contribution you made to the production efforts of ABC Company last year? Is it the shiny new MBA you recently achieved, with honors? Is it your exceptional communication skills and winning presentational presence?
No. It is your contact information. Who you are and how your reader can reach you is, when all is said and done, the most important information in your entire document.
See, this is getting easier. You know who you are, you know where you live, you know your phone number and e-mail address. You already know the most important information in your entire resume document!
 
Objective Statement
That done, the next piece of information to include (or not include) is your "objective statement."
Do you need one? Well, let us take a look at your career history. Is your background consistently (and clearly) in line with the positions you are targeting? Without an objective statement, will the reader know your career direction and will he or she recognize the position for which you are applying?
If your background, for example, is in operations management, and the three most recent positions you have listed are "Operations Manager," and the position for which you are applying is "Operations Manager,"  is there any real need to say you want to be an operations manager?
 
Objective statements are most useful when:
The resume is being submitted for a specific position at a specific company ("To obtain the position of Operations Manager for ABC Company where my extensive skills and background in ______________________, ____________________, and _____________________ may be best applied to achieve ABC's operational goals").
The candidate is changing career paths ("To use my extensive background in sales, marketing, and personnel management for the benefit of ABC Company's operational efforts").
The candidate is a recent graduate with little hands-on experience.
Any time the career history alone does not present an easily identifiable "fit" for the position being targeted.
At all times when writing your resume, keep your audience, the reader, in mind. You want to make this easy on your reader. Do not write an objective statement that is vague, or one that tells your reader what you are hoping to secure ("a challenging position that offers room for advancement"), but rather what you have to offer.
 












































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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