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Resume Writing Basics Part-2 : Professional Summary Profile Qualifications or Synopsis














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Professional Summary, Profile, Qualifications or Synopsis
A summary is not simply a brief listing of what you have done, but what you know you can do.
It is a package of skills and characteristics you offer a company. Example:
Senior Operations Manager offering an impressive #-year background in ___________
Outstanding ______________, ______________, and _______________ skills. Able to...
Proven record of (improving, increasing, strengthening)______________, through...
Computer proficient in...
Remember that criteria you already know? That, and the unique skills and abilities you possess - relevant to the position(s) being targeted - are what go into this section.
For example, if an ad states that "communication skills" are an important criteria for the position, you had better make certain "communication skills" are incorporated into your summary section as one of the skills you possess. You could (and should) take this one step further and let your reader know how these communication skills are used for the benefit of the employer: "build motivated and productive teams, generate long-term client commitments, facilitate communications..."
You can find the criteria for a job through: a job ad, via networking, company research, and research of similar ads (and requirements) for other positions.
 
Employment History / Career Background
The biggest error candidates make when writing a resume is to tell a "story." I do not mean writing fiction, although that would be a bad idea, too, but writing their history as if it were a conversation; using lots of "I" statements and "Responsible for" statements. The resume then ends up reading like a dialogue or a laundry list, rather than a professional presentation.
If you had to bring your history down to its most basic form it would be: Problem, Solution, Results.
 
Every job is held in order to solve a problem, from the receptionist to the company president. Work is generated because there is a problem that needs addressing, the actual work is the solution, and the outcome of that work is the result (positive or negative).
Eliminate the “I” statements and begin each responsibility statement with a strong action word that best denotes your role and level of responsibilities. See some examples of strong action words at the end of this article.
For example:
Instead of: "I manage the daily operations of..." or "I'm responsible for daily operations of..."
Write: "Manage daily operations of..."
Let’s look at this "Problem, Solution, Result" using the receptionist as our example:
The receptionist is hired to solve the problems of: ringing phones, client questions, schedules of meetings and appointments, paperwork management, etc. Those are otherwise known as his or her "responsibilities."
His or her solution is to: answer the phones in a responsive and timely manner, provide accurate information to clients, organize a logical and workable schedule of appointments and meetings, and coordinate paperwork so that it is easily retrieved on demand.
The results of his or her work (if positive) are: the phones are answered in a timely and efficient manner (clients feel that they are important to the company and that his or her needs are being addressed by someone who cares), information provided to clients is accurate and helpful (this company not only understands my questions, but they have the answers), schedules and meetings are workable and productive (beneficial to cost, time and operational issues), paperwork is reliably managed and maintained (important information is easily accessed - no frustration in trying to locate an important but missing file - and the information it contains can be counted on to be accurate and up-to-date - I'm not going to look like an idiot when I talk to the client).
 
How might this information be listed on his or her resume?
Office Manager
ABC Company, City, State
January 2004 – Present
Direct and oversee busy office operations for leading advertising firm.
Schedule and coordinate client meetings and corporate appointments for Senior A
dvertising Director and Marketing Manager.
Manage multiple-line telephone system, providing fast and efficient service to
client and potential client inquiries. Position requires detailed understanding of
current industry standards.
 
Coordinate and maintain database and paperwork management. Ensure records and schedules are accurate and consistently maintained.
Improved inquiry response time and accuracy of information by 70% through the creation and implementation of an improved...
Isn't this an improvement over: "I am responsible for phones, appointment scheduling, and paperwork?" or, worse yet, "I'm just a secretary?"
Each position is important, and each individual who holds that position provides value.
Recognizing, fully, what services you provide, and the appreciable results you produce, should help you in presenting this information to your, so that he or she may appreciate it, as well. Continued..... Basics Of Resume Writing Part-3












































 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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